Dakota Wesleyan University, prospective students often ask me if they really can complete an online degree program while working and raising families."> Dakota Wesleyan University, prospective students often ask me if they really can complete an online degree program while working and raising families." />

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DWU’s Turner: ‘Yes, You Can Fit an Online Degree Into Your Life’

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In my role as online admissions counselor at Dakota Wesleyan University, prospective students often ask me if they really can complete an online degree program while working and raising families.

Without hesitation, I tell them “yes.”

Our fully online degrees at DWU were designed specifically with working adults in mind. The online format, with courses available 24/7, allows students the flexibility to fit their studies into their life. They were created so adult learners could succeed.

Students can choose to be full-time students and complete their studies in 14 months or go part-time and finish in 26 months (though programs like our Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Leadership will take longer). Some students start out full time and then scale back to part time—or start part time and switch to full time. Students appreciate having that option.

Prospective students also ask me how much time they should devote each week for their studies. This question has no correct answer. I tell students it depends on their motivation, their reading habits, research, and their desire to do well. With that said, on average, part-time students spend 10-12 hours per week while full-time students spend 20-22 hours.

I let them know that our students succeed because they’re willing to put in the time—whenever and wherever they can carve out that time. For some that’s over their lunch breaks at work, after dinner, while they wait for their child to finish dance class or Little League practice, or after their family has gone to bed.

Often, adults are at a point in their career where they need to finish their degree to move up. They may feel anxious or fearful or a lot of other emotions. I remind prospective student that they are not alone. Most of their classmates will be in similar situations. Even though these are online programs, community does happen. Our students navigate the online environment together. They share study tips, post encouraging words to each other, and support one another as they balance their studies with their personal and professional commitments. Professors also do all they can to help students succeed.

Tune in for our next blog, in which actual DWU students share how they find time to study.

In the meantime, I invite you to email me if you have other questions or would like more information about online degrees at DWU.

Amber Turner

Online Admissions Counselor

Dakota Wesleyan University